1-888-317-7920 info@2ndwatch.com

AWS says Amazon Redshift is the world’s fastest cloud data warehouse, allowing customers to analyze petabytes of structured and semi-structured data at high speeds that allow for exploratory analysis. According to a 2018 Forrester report, Redshift is the most popular cloud data warehouse for enterprises.

To better understand how enterprises are using Redshift, 2nd Watch surveyed Redshift users at large companies. A majority of respondents (57%) said their Redshift implementation had delivered on corporate expectations, while another 26% said it had “somewhat” delivered.

With all the benefits Redshift enables, it’s no wonder tens of thousands of customers use it. Benefits like three times the performance of any cloud data warehouse or being 50% less expensive than all other cloud data warehouses make it an attractive service to Fortune 500 companies and startups alike, including McDonald’s, Lyft, Comcast, and Yelp, among others.

Overall Findings:

Despite its apparent success in the market, not all Redshift deployments have gone according to plan. 45% of respondents said queries stacking up in queues was a recurring problem in their Redshift deployment; 30% said some of their Data Analyst’s time was unproductive as a result of tuning Redshift queries; and 34% said queries were taking more than one minute to return results. Meanwhile, 33% said they were struggling to manage requests for permissions, and 25% said their Redshift costs were higher than anticipated.

Query and Queuing Learnings:

Queuing of queries is not a new problem. Redshift has a long-underutilized feature called Workload Management queues, or WLM. These queues are like different entrances to a baseball stadium. They all go to the same baseball game, but with different ways to get in. WLM queues divvy up compute and processing power among groups of users so no single “heavy” user ends up dominating the database and preventing others from accessing. It’s common to have queries stack up in the Default WLM queue. A better pattern is to have at least three or four different workload management queues:

  1. ETL processes
  2. Administration
  3. Ad hoc exploration
  4. Data loading and unloading

As for time lost due to performance tuning, this is a tradeoff with Redshift: it is inexpensive on the compute side but takes some care and attention on the human side. Redshift is extremely high-performing when designed and implemented correctly for your use case. It’s common for Redshift users to design tables at the beginning of a data load, then not return to the design until there is a problem, after other data sets enter the warehouse. It’s a best practice to routinely run ANALYZE and have auto-vacuum turned on, and to know how your most common queries are structured, so you can sort tables accordingly.

If queries are taking a long time to run, you need to ask whether the latency is due to the heavy processing needs of the query, or if the tables are designed inefficiently with respect to the query. For example, if a query aggregates sales by date, but the timestamp for sales is not a sort key, the query planner might have to traverse many different tables just to make sure it has all the right data, therefore taking a long time. On the other hand, if your data is already nicely sorted but you have to aggregate terabytes of data into a single value, then waiting a minute or more for data is not unusual.

Permissions

Some survey respondents mentioned that permissions were difficult to manage. There are several options for configuring access to Redshift. Some users create database users and groups internal to Redshift and manage authentication at the database level (for example, logging in via SQL Workbench). Others delegate permissions with an identity provider like Active Directory.

Implementation and Cost Savings

Enterprise IT directors are working to overcome their Redshift implementation challenges. 30% said they are rewriting queries, and 28% said they have compressed their data in S3 as part of a LakeHouse architecture. Query tuning was having the greatest impact on the performance of Redshift clusters.

When Redshift costs exceed the plan, it is a good practice to assess where the costs are coming from. Is it from storage, compute, or something else? Generally, if you are looking to save on Redshift spend, you should explore a LakeHouse architecture, which is a storage pattern that shifts data between S3 and your Redshift cluster. When you need lots of data for analysis, data is loaded into Redshift. When you don’t need that data anymore, it is moved back to S3 where storage is much cheaper. However, the tradeoff is that analysis is slower when data is in S3.

Another place to look for cost savings is in the instance size. It is possible to have over-provisioned your Redshift nodes. Look for metrics like CPU utilization; if it is consistently 25% or even 30% or lower, then you have too much headroom and might be over-provisioned.

Popular Features

Challenges aside, enterprise IT directors seem to love Redshift. The top four Redshift features, according to our survey, are query monitoring rules (cited by 44% of respondents), federated queries (35%) and custom-built ETL workflows (33%).

Query Monitoring Rules are custom rules that track bad or slow queries. Customers love Query Monitoring Rules because they are simple to write and give you great visibility into queries that will disrupt operations. You can choose obvious metrics like query_execution_time, or more subtle things like query_blocks_read, which would be a proxy for how much searching the query planner has to do to get data. Customers like these features because the reporting is central, and it frees them from having to manually check queries themselves.

Federated queries allow you to bring in live, external data to join with your internal Redshift data. You can query, for example, an RDS instance in the same SQL statement as a query against your Redshift cluster. This allows for dynamic and powerful analysis that normally would take many time-consuming steps to get the data in the same place.

Finally, custom-built ETL workflows have become popular for several reasons. One, the sheer compute power sitting in Redshift makes it a very popular source for compute resources. Unused compute can be used for ongoing ETL. You would have to pay for this compute whether or not you use it. Two, and this is an interesting twist, Redshift has become a popular ETL tool because of its capabilities in processing SQL statements. Yes, ETL written in SQL has become popular, especially for complicated transformations and joins that would be cumbersome to write in Python, Scala, or Java.

Conclusion

Redshift’s place in the enterprise IT stack seems secure, though how IT departments use the solution will likely change over time – significantly, perhaps. The reason for persisting in all the maintenance tasks listed above, is that Redshift is increasingly becoming the centerpiece for a data-driven analytics program. Data volume is not shrinking; it is always growing. If you take advantage of these performance features, you will make the most of your Redshift cluster and therefore your analytics program.

Download the infographic on our survey findings.

-Rob Whelan, Data Engineering & Analytics Practice Director

 

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmailrss