As a business scales, so does its software and infrastructure. As desired outcomes adapt and become more complex that can quickly cause a lot of overhead and difficulty for platform teams to manage over time and these challenges often limit the benefits of embracing containers and serverless. Shared services offer many advantages in these scenarios by providing a consistent developer experience while also increasing productivity and effectivity of governance and cost management.

Introduced in December 2020 Amazon Web Services announced the general availability of Proton: an application targeted at providing tooling to manage complex environments while bridging infrastructure and deployment for developers. In this blog we will take a closer look into the benefits of the AWS Proton service offering.

What is AWS Proton?

AWS Proton is a fully managed delivery service, targeted at container and serverless workloads, that provides engineering teams the tooling to automate provisioning and deploy applications while enabling them to provide observability and enforce compliance and best practices. With AWS Proton, development teams utilize resources for infrastructure and to deploy their code. This in turn increases developer productivity by allowing them to focus on their code, software delivery, reduce management overhead, and increase release frequency. Teams can use AWS Proton through the AWS Console and the AWS CLI, allowing for teams to get started quickly and automate complicated operations over time.

How does it work?

The AWS Proton framework allows administrators to define versioned templates which standardize infrastructure, enforce guard rails, leverage Infrastructure as Code with CloudFormation, and provide CI/CD with Code Pipeline and Code Build to automate provisioning and deployments. Once service templates are defined, developers can choose a template and use it to deploy their software. As new code is released, the CI/CD pipelines automatically deploys the changes. Additionally, as new template versions are defined, AWS Proton provides a “one-click” interface which allows administrators to roll out infrastructure updates across all the outdated template versions.

When is AWS Proton right for you?

AWS Proton is built for teams looking to centrally manage their cloud resources. The service interface is built for teams to provision deploy and monitor applications. AWS Proton is worth considering if you are using cloud native services like Serverless applications or if you utilize containers in AWS. The benefits continually grow when working with a service-oriented architecture, microservices, or distributed software as it eases release management, reduces lead time, and creates an environment for teams to operate within a set of rules with little to no additional overhead. AWS Proton is also a good option if you are looking to introduce Infrastructure as Code or CI/CD pipelines to new or even existing software as AWS Proton supports linking existing resources.

Getting Started is easy!

Platform Administrators

Since AWS Proton itself is free and you only pay for the underlying resources, you are only a few steps away from giving it a try! First a member of the platform infrastructure team creates an environment template. An environment defines infrastructure that is foundational to your applications and services including compute networking (VPCs), Code Pipelines, Security, and Monitoring. Environments are defined via CloudFormation templates and use Jinja for parameters rather than the conventional parameters section in standard CloudFormation templates. You can find template parameter examples in the AWS documentation. You can create, view, update, and manage your environment templates and their versions in the AWS Console.

Introduction to AWS Proton Service | 2nd Watch

Once an environment template is created the platform administrator would create a service template which defines all resources that are logically relative to a service. For example, if we had a container which performs some ETL this could contain an ECR Repository, ECS Cluster, ECS Service Definition, ECS Task Definition, IAM roles, and the ETL source and target storage.

In another example, we could have an asynchronous lambda which performs some background tasks and its corresponding execution role. You could also consider using schema files for parameter validation! Like environment templates, you can create, view, update, and manage your service templates and their versions in the AWS Console.

Once the templates have been created the platform administrator can publish the templates and provision the environment. Since services also include CI/CD pipelines platform administrators should also configure repository connections by creating the GitHub app connector. This is done in the AWS Developer Tools service or a link can be found on the AWS Proton page in the Console.

Once authorized, the GitHub app is automatically created and integrated with AWS and CI/CD pipelines will automatically detect available connections during service configuration.

 

At this time platform administrators should see a stack which contains the environment’s resources. They can validate each resource, interconnectivity, security, audits, and operational excellence.

Developers

At this point developers can choose which version they will use to deploy their service. Available services can be found in the AWS Console and developers can review the template and requirements before deployment. Once they have selected the target template they choose the repository that contains their service code, the GitHub app connection created by the platform administrator, and any parameters required by the service and CodePipeline.

After some time, developers should be able to see their application stack in CloudFormation, their application’s CodePipeline resources, and the resources for their application accordingly!

In Closing

AWS Proton is a new and exciting service available for those looking to adopt Infrastructure as Code, enable CI/CD pipelines for their products, and enforce compliance, consistent standards, and best practices across their software and infrastructure. Here we explored a simple use case, but real world scenarios likely require a more thorough examination and implementation.

AWS Proton may require a transition for teams that already utilize IaC, CI/CD, or that have created processes to centrally manage their platform infrastructure. 2nd Watch has over 10 years’ experience in helping companies move to the cloud and implement shared services platforms to simplify modern cloud operations. Start a conversation with a solution expert from 2nd Watch today and together we will assess and create a plan built for your goals and targets!

-Isaiah Grant, Cloud Consultant

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