Back to the Basics: The 3 Cloud Computing Service Delivery Models

In recent years, the adoption of cloud computing services has increased tremendously, especially given the onset of the pandemic. According to a report from the International Data Corporation (IDC), the public cloud services market grew 24.1% year over year in 2020. This increase in popularity is credited to the benefits provided by cloud including flexibility, on-demand capacity planning, cost reductions, and ability for users to access shared resources from anywhere.

No matter where you are in your cloud journey, understanding foundational concepts like the different types of cloud service models is important to your success in the cloud. These cloud computing service models provide different levels of control, flexibility, and management capabilities. With a greater understanding of the models, their benefits, and the different ways to deploy these infrastructures, you can determine the method that matches your business needs best.

What are the 3 Cloud Computing Service Delivery Models?

Different cloud computing service delivery models help meet different needs, and determining which model is best for you is an important first step when you transition to the cloud. The three major models are IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

IaaS is one of the most flexible cloud computing models. The infrastructure and its features are presented in a completely remote environment, allowing clients direct access to servers, networking, storage, and availability zones. Additionally, IaaS environments have automated deployments, significantly speeding up your operations in comparison to manual deployments. Some examples of IaaS vendors include Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. In these types of environments, the vendor is responsible for the infrastructure, but the users still have complete control over the Identity Access Management, data, applications, runtime, middleware, operating system, and virtual network.

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

Another cloud computing service delivery model is Platform as a Service (PaaS). PaaS is a subset of IaaS, except customers are only responsible for Identity Access Management, data, and applications and it removes the need for organizations to manage the underlying infrastructure. Rather than having the responsibility over hardware and operating systems as with IaaS, PaaS helps you focus on the deployment and management of your applications. There is less need for resource procurement, capacity planning, software maintenance, and patching. Some examples of PaaS include Windows Azure, Google AppEngine and AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

Software as a Service (SaaS)

Perhaps the most well-known of all three models is SaaS, where the deployment is redistributed to third party services. The customer’s only responsibilities are Identity Access Management, data, and the task of managing software. SaaS offers the entire package offered between IaaS and PaaS, as infrastructure, middleware, and applications deployed over the web can be seamlessly accessed from any place at any time, no matter the platform. Vendors of SaaS include CRM services like Salesforce and productivity software services like Google Apps. One major benefit of SaaS is that it reduces the costs of software ownership and eliminates the need for IT staff to manage the software so your company can focus on what it does best.  Another benefit of SaaS that its relevance to businesses today, as SaaS is considered the best option for remote collaboration. With SaaS, your applications can be accessed from any geographical location and your company is not responsible for managing the hardware.

Choosing the Cloud Computing Model that is Right for You

 Each cloud computing service model has different benefits to consider when determining the model that will work best for your business needs, projects, and goals.

While IaaS gives you complete control over your infrastructure, some businesses may decide they do not need to fully manage their applications and infrastructure on their own. IaaS is considered a good fit for SMEs and startups who do not have the resources or time to buy and build the infra for their own network. Additionally, larger companies may prefer to have complete control and scalability over their infrastructure, so they too may opt for IaaS for a pay-as-you go, remote option with powerful tools. One downside to IaaS is that it is more costly in comparison to PaaS and SaaS cloud computing models, yet it does minimize costs in the sense it eliminates the need to deploy on-premises hardware.

IaaS Benefits

  • Reduced vendor lock-in
  • Platform virtualizations
  • On-demand scaling
  • GUI and API-based access
  • Increased security
  • Multi-tenant architecture

IaaS Disadvantages

  • Potential for vendor outages
  • The cost of training how to manage new infrastructure

PaaS is a good choice if you are looking to decrease your application’s time-to-market, because of its remote flexibility and accessibility. Thus, if your project involves multiple developers and vendors, each have quick accessibility to computing and networking resources through a PaaS. PaaS might also be used by a team of developers to test software and applications.

PaaS Benefits

  • Rapid product development through simplified process
  • Custom solutions
  • Highly scalable
  • Eliminates need to manage basic infrastructure
  • Future-proof
  • Multi-tenant architecture

PaaS Disadvantages

  • Security issues
  • Increased dependency on vendor for speed and support

SaaS is a feasible option for smaller companies that need to launch their ecommerce quickly or for short term projects that require quick, easy, and affordable collaboration from either a web or mobile standpoint. Any company that requires frequent collaboration such as transferring content and scheduling meetings will find SaaS convenient and accessible.

SaaS Benefits

  • On-demand service
  • Automated provisioning/management of your cloud infrastructure
  • Subscription-based billing
  • Allows for full remote collaboration
  • Reduced software costs
  • Pay-as-you-go

SaaS Disadvantages

  • Less control
  • Limited solutions

The 3 Cloud Computing Deployment Models

Another foundational concept of cloud are the deployment models. A deployment model is where your infrastructure resides and also determines who has control over its management. Like the cloud computing service delivery models, it is also important to choose the deployment model that will best meet the needs of your business.

There are three types of cloud computing deployment models:

Public Cloud

A cloud deployment means your applications are fully run in the cloud and accessible by the public. Often, organizations will choose a public cloud deployment for scalability reasons or when security is not a main concern. For example, when testing an application. Businesses may choose to create or migrate applications to the cloud to take advantage of its benefits, such as its easy set-up and low costs. Additionally, a public cloud deployment allows for a cloud service provider to manage your cloud infrastructure for you.

On-Premises/Private

 An on-premises cloud deployment, or private cloud deployment, is for companies who need to protect and secure their data and are willing to pay more to do so. Since its on-premises, the data and infrastructure are accessed and managed by your own IT team. Due to in-house maintenance and fixed scalability, this deployment model is the costliest.

Hybrid

 A hybrid cloud deployment connects cloud-based resources and existing non-cloud resources that do not exist in the cloud. The most common way to do this is between a public cloud and on-premises infrastructure. Through a hybrid cloud integration, you can segment data according to the needs of your business. For example, putting your highly sensitive data on-premises while putting less-sensitive data on the public cloud for accessibility and cost-effectiveness. This allows you to enjoy the benefits of the cloud while maintaining a secure environment for your data.

Next Steps

Determining the cloud computing service delivery model and deployment model best for your organization are both critical steps to the success of your company’s cloud computing journey. Get it right the first time by consulting with 2nd Watch. With a decade of experience as a managed service provider, we provide cloud services for your public cloud workloads. As an AWS Consulting Partner, Gold Microsoft Partner, and Google Cloud Partner, our team has the knowledge and expertise to efficiently guide you through your cloud journey. Contact us to learn more or talk to one of our experts.

-Tessa Foley, Marketing

2nd Watch Named "Leader" in Gartner’s New Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Managed Service Providers Report

2nd Watch is honored to be named a leader in the 2017 Gartner “Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure Managed Service Providers, Worldwide” report.  We want to thank our customers that have partnered with us throughout the years and our employees who are key to 2nd Watch’s continued success and the success of our customers.

What are the contributing factors to our success?

  • One of the longest track records in AWS consulting services and a very close partnership with AWS. We understand the AWS environment and how to best operate within it, and we have numerous customer case studies, large-scale implementations, and a solid track record of positive customer experiences and strong customer retention. We have in-depth expertise in helping traditional businesses launch and operate digital business offerings.
  • A well-established cloud migration factory. Our professional services help enterprise customers with cloud readiness assessments, security assessments and cloud governance structures. We also assist customers with re-engineering IT processes for the cloud and integrating cloud processes with other established business processes.
  • Our Cloud Management Platform, which provides policy-driven governance capabilities, while still allowing the customer to fully exploit the underlying cloud platform

Gartner positioned 2nd Watch in the Leaders quadrant for its ability to execute and completeness of vision.  We are all-in with AWS Cloud and are committed to the success of our clients as evidenced in our use cases.

Some of the world’s largest enterprises partner with 2nd Watch for our ability to deliver tailored and integrated management solutions that holistically and proactively encompass the operating, financial, and technical requirements for public cloud adoption. In the end, customers gain more leverage from the cloud with a lot less risk.

We look forward to continued success in 2017 and beyond through successful customer implementations and ongoing management. To find out how we can partner with your company, visit us here.

Access Gartner’s “Magic Quadrant for Public Cloud Infrastructure Managed Service Providers, Worldwide” report, compliments of 2nd Watch.

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. GARTNER is a registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally, and is used herein with permission. All rights reserved.

2016 Enterprise Cloud Predictions

Public cloud computing is still hot for the enterprise, even though we’ve been talking about it for years now. In 2016, however, the industry will see a decided maturing of offerings, with a focus on enterprise computing needs that go beyond development and . For instance, in the area of data management, especially big data analytics, the cloud is the only way to cost-effectively handle the scalability and elasticity needs of ingesting terabytes of real-time data on a daily basis. Moving on, here are some other areas to watch in 2016.

Public cloud security: A significant development at the Amazon re:Invent show was AWS’ announcement of its web application firewall. Today, there are limited options for a watertight public cloud native security solution, so Amazon stepped in to fulfill that need. Vendors that are trying to take their on-premise security solutions to the cloud aren’t yet succeeding in that endeavor. Just as traditional hardware vendors are becoming obsolete because of the cloud, infrastructure software is heading down the same path. Security-as-a-service providers are maturing their offerings, especially through security management services that help companies better understand the loopholes they have in the cloud. Alert Logic’s recent launch of Cloud Insight is a good example of the kind of innovation happening in pockets in the public cloud for security-as-a-service.  A majority of breaches in cloud are due to misconfigurations, so providers that can help monitor this risk and provide recommendations, are a great asset. Enterprise security is a complex problem to solve; enterprises want a single vendor that can deliver the full solution covering security auditing and logging, user access and control, API endpoint monitoring and overall governance. This will be the year when CIOs will work harder toward developing standards for configuration, reference architecture, tools and more, for working in the cloud.

Internet of Things: Most large enterprise vendors are staking a claim in the IoT marketplace, and cloud providers are no exception. AWS announced its IoT platform in October and the strategy is smart, taking a page from the Microsoft playbook of 20 or 30 years ago. Build a platform which makes it easy for developers to create applications and services on top, which thereby grows adoption of the base product. AWS and other providers will develop solutions helping CIOs securely connect sensors to the cloud and manage the data. This will solve one of the burdensome complexity issues around IoT. Developers love this model, because they can help deliver a business need but they don’t have to worry about the underlying technology enabling hyper-connectivity. Through a management infrastructure and standard frameworks for communications, cloud providers will make it dead simple for companies to start from scratch on IoT. The cloud is today the only way to launch and maintain an IoT project, given the extreme scale and real-time processing demands in these applications.

Big legacy applications in the cloud: Next year will be the end of IT executives complaining that the public cloud can’t handle their scalability needs in regard to large legacy applications. Massive instance sizes, such as AWS X1, will be available to deliver all the terabytes and processing needs required even by the largest of companies. A CIO can migrate the SAP or Oracle environment, unchanged, to the cloud. That’s a game changer. Let’s face it: big companies are not getting rid of their legacy ERP and financial systems anytime soon, and few IT executives want to spend the time, money and risk redesigning these monolithic applications for the cloud. We expect to also see increasing investment by public cloud providers in the full suite of enterprise IT requirements such as multi-layered security, auditing logging, and change management. CIOs must be able to track changes to their environment, no matter where the systems are being hosted. That is critical for compliance, security and governance. We are bullish that large companies will increasingly trust in the capabilities of major cloud providers to meet legacy application needs without increasing risk, or compromising productivity and customer relationships.

-Kris Bliesner, CTO

This article was first published on VMblog.com on 11/9/15.

Cloud Forecast 2015: Skills, Security and Public Cloud Infrastructure

Public cloud is growing. Private cloud is not. Big Data and Internet of Things is hot. Virtualization is not. These are just a few of the findings of the 2nd Watch enterprise cloud trends survey, just released. More than 400 IT managers and executives from large companies participated, and 64% of them said that they will spend at least 15% more in 2015 on public cloud infrastructure. All signs point to the fact that the public cloud is continuing to grow. Q3 earnings statements from both Amazon and Microsoft for their respective cloud services, AWS and Azure, were robust.

Companies are going to need some help though. As always, IT skills are at a premium. In our own conversations with customers, supported by the survey, CIOs and CTOs are looking for bright engineers who know how to manage and optimize workloads in the cloud. As well, the ability to natively design applications for the public cloud will be a critical competitive advantage in the coming year. The opportunity is there for any company – regardless of your size or industry. Large consumer goods are innovating with mobile apps that require not just savvy developers, but an IT organization that can leverage public cloud services to mash-up data and deliver cool new services that drive brand loyalty.

The trick is that each provider, such as AWS, operates differently. CIOs need specialists, and when they’re hard to find, using third-party experts can reduce risks and deliver faster ROI. 2nd Watch has years of diversified experience across many different project types, regimented training and continued learning programs for their employees that can supplement your IT staff.

A parallel challenge is that few large companies are ready to migrate their entire data center to the cloud just yet. With legacy applications and customer requirements, large companies typically still require or desire some systems to be hosted on their own data centers. Thus, cloud providers and technologies that are able to integrate data centers will see ample demand next year. Hybrid cloud terminology will still be popular with enterprise IT in 2015, according to our survey. However, this is not an end state but a state of transition in maintaining physical data centers while they migrate to public cloud.

The recent news that the AWS OpsWorks application management service (based on Chef) is now available for managing public cloud and on-premise servers is one sign of the growing flexibility that CIOs will have in managing workloads across their environments. Companies want to see more industrial-strength management tools that can bridge internal data centers and public cloud data centers and deliver a unified picture of the entire infrastructure.

IT executives are also looking for more help on the security front. The major public cloud providers are already investing heavily in this area, particularly AWS, but startups will play a significant role in bringing new endpoint security solutions to market in 2015. Survey participants said that security tools and services is the most underinvested category by cloud technology firms. I believe they will say differently in a year’s time. Software companies also have opportunities in modern IT management, with many companies demanding more automated options for performance monitoring, system management and change management in the cloud.

If you are interested in learning more about the best-in-class cloud management tools that are available today, schedule your free 2nd Watch Workshop now*.

*Applies to Enterprise Customers new to 2nd Watch with a specific use case to build the workshop around.

Download the full Infographic for more trends to watch for in 2015.

Read more on Enterprise Cloud Trends for 2015 in 2nd Watch CTO, Kris Bliesner’s, article in Data Center Knowledge – Planning for the Future: Enterprise Cloud Trends in 2015.

-Jeff Aden, EVP of Marketing & Strategic Business Development

Hey, You, Get Off My Cloud

2nd Watch Director of Engineering, Chris Nolan, discusses the public vs. private cloud architecture debate in the Industry Perspectives content channel of Data Center Knowledge, published today. Read the full article for Chris’ guidance on cloud strategy and points to consider when making your decision.