Why You Need to Modernize Your Media Supply Chain

The demand for direct-to-consumer services and media content is continuously growing, and with that, audiences are raising their expectations of media and entertainment companies. Agile and innovative companies, such as Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon Prime, have arguably created and continue to enable the current viewership trends.

These streaming services have disrupted the traditional media landscape by empowering audiences to watch any content wherever and whenever they want. To accommodate new audience behaviors, relevant media companies use technologies to support the modern-day digital media supply chain, which has become increasingly complex to manage.

Why You Need to Modernize Your Media Supply Chain

However, legacy media companies have something that audiences still want: content. Most of these institutions have massive budgets for content production and enormous existing media libraries that have latent revenue potential. For example, legacy media brands own nostalgic cult classics, like “The Office,” that viewers will always want to watch, even though they have watched these episodes multiple times before.

As the volume of content consumption and demand increases, media organizations will find that a traditional media supply chain will constrain their ability to grow and meet customers in their preferred venues, despite owning a broad range of content that viewers want to watch. In order to keep up with audience demand, media companies will need to transform their media supply chains, so that they can distribute their media quickly and at scale, or they risk falling behind. Cloud technologies are the key to modernizing digital asset management, metadata models, quality control, and content delivery networks.

The Challenges of a Traditional Media Supply Chain

There are a lot of moving parts and behind-the-scenes work for media and entertainment businesses to push media assets to audiences. The media supply chain is the process used to create, manage, and deliver digital media from the point of origin (creator, content provider, content owner, etc.) to the destination (the audience.) For the right content and best experience to reach users on devices and platforms of their choice, digital media files must pass through various stages of processing and different workflows.

Media supply chain management is challenging and if there are inefficiencies within this  process, issues that will ultimately affect the bottom line will crop up. The following are top challenges of media supply chain management:

Decentralized Assets

The content wars are in full swing, and as a result, the media and entertainment industry has seen an influx of divestitures, mergers, and acquisitions. Organizations are accumulating as much content as possible by bolstering their media production with media acquisition, but as a result, content management has become more difficult. With more content comes more problems because this introduces more siloed third-party partners. As companies merge, the asset management system becomes decentralized, and media files and metadata are spread across different storage arrays in different datacenters that are managed by different MAMs with various metadata repositories.

Reliance on Manual Processes

Legacy media companies have been around much longer than modern technologies. As a result, some of these organizations still do many media production and distribution tasks manually, especially when it comes to generating, reviewing, and approving metadata. Metadata is essential for sorting, categorizing, routing, and archiving media content, as well as making the content accessible to a global, diverse audience. Using manual processes for these functions not only severely slows down a business, but they are also susceptible to human-error.

Quality of Media Assets

Today, consumers have the latest technology (4K TVs, surround sound systems, etc.), which requires the highest quality version of content sources. With dispersed content libraries and team, working derivative edits to meet localization and licensing requirements and locating native frame rate masters can be a challenging and time-consuming problem to tackle.

Benefits of Using Cloud Technology to Modernize the Media Supply Chain

Cloud-based technologies can help manage and resolve the issues typically encountered in a media supply chain. If media organizations do not utilize cloud solutions to modernize their supply chain, they risk being less agile to meet global audience demand, incurring higher costs to deliver media, and eroding viewership.

Legacy media brands are recognizing the consequences of not adopting modern technology to support their media supply chains, and recently, we’ve seen established media corporations partnering with cloud service providers to undertake a digital transformation. A recent and newsworthy example of this is the MGM and AWS partnership. MGM owns a deep library of film and television content, and by leveraging AWS, MGM is able to distribute this content with flexibility, scalability, reliability, and security to their audiences. AWS offers services and tools to modernize MGM’s media supply chain to be able to distribute content across multiple platforms quickly and at scale.

Businesses don’t need to strike historic deals with cloud service providers to receive the same benefits. By transforming into a cloud-based framework, any media company can reap the following major benefits of modernizing their media supply chain:

Scale and Agility

This point cannot be repeated enough because, again, customer media consumption is rapidly increasing, and businesses must find a way to meet those demands in order to retain customers and remain competitive. With cloud computing, the media supply chain is no longer limited to the capacity of on-premise data centers or the capital expenditure budget that was forecasted a year earlier. Using cloud technology allows organizations to be dynamic and flexible to adjust for growing demand. Businesses can easily scale services up (or even down) based on audience demands by simply adding (or removing) more cloud resources, which is easier and more forgiving than having to add more infrastructure or being stuck with wasted databases.

Cost Effective

Cloud services employ pay-as-you-go billing, which allows companies to pay for what they use rather than paying a fixed cost that may not fit their needs later on down the road. Most importantly, using the cloud removes the maintenance and operational costs associated with  maintaining data center footprints. The costs of server hardware, power consumption, and space for traditional data centers can really add up, especially because these costs are inflexible based on actual consumption. Utilizing cloud technology provides flexibility in billing and trims down maintenance costs.

Automation and Efficiency

Cloud services offer tools that can handle abstract operational complexities, like metadata management, that were historically done manually. These automation and AI features can dramatically reduce the need to manually generate this metadata because it implements machine learning and video, audio, and image recognition to largely automate the generation, review, and approval of metadata. Harnessing the power of automation frees up teams’ resources and time and redirects that energy on impactful, business-differentiating activities.

Data-Driven Decisions

Large audiences also means large amounts of data. Massive volumes of both structured and unstructured data requires increased processing power, storage, and more. Cloud computing has the scalable infrastructure to rapidly manage huge spikes of real time traffic or usage. Moreover, cloud service providers offer a variety of analytic tools that enable extract, transform, and loading of enormous datasets to provide meaningful insights quickly. Media companies can harness this data to improve user experiences and optimize supply chains, all of which greatly affects their bottom line.

How do I Get Started in my Media Supply Chain Transformation?

The process is less daunting than you think, and there are experienced cloud advisors and consulting firms who can point you in the right direction. At 2nd Watch, we embrace your unique modernization journey to help transform and modernize your business and achieve true business growth through cloud adoption. To learn more about our media cloud services, visit our Media and Entertainment page or talk to someone directly through our Contact Us page.

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Why You Should Invest in Managed Cloud Security Services

Cloud adoption throughout all industries has become incredibly pervasive in recent years. With cloud management as a relatively newer concept, business organizations may struggle to understand each aspect that is required to effectively run a cloud environment. One aspect that should be involved at every layer of the cloud is security, yet many organizations fail to implement a strong security system in their cloud until an attack happens and it is too late.

Managed Cloud Security Services

A cloud environment and the controls necessary to orchestrate a robust security and governance platform is not the same as your traditional on-premises environment.

The State of Cloud Security Today

As beneficial as the public cloud is for companies globally today, lack of security in the cloud can be a major issue. A report from Sophos indicated that iMost of these attacks are simply from misconfigurations of these organizations’ cloud security. Thus, the attacks can be prevented if configured and managed properly. Orca Security’s 2020 State of Public Cloud Security Report revealed that 80.7% of organizations have at least one neglected, internet-facing workload – meaning the OS is unsupported or unpatched. Attackers can use one small vulnerability as leverage to move across an organization, which is how most data breaches occur.

Managed cloud security services help lay a strong foundation for security in the cloud that is automated and continuous with 24/7 management. With constant management, threats and attacks are detected before they occur, and your business avoids the repercussions that come with security misconfigurations.

What are managed cloud security services?

Managed cloud security services provide security configurations, automation, 24/7 management, and reporting from an external cloud security provider. If an attack should occur, the result is downtime and the loss of money and data. Additionally, the lack of a well-rounded security system can lead to regulatory compliance challenges.

Monitoring and maintaining strong security requires continuous attention to be effective. Employing a managed security service gives businesses the protection they need while simultaneously providing IT departments with additional time to focus on other business concerns. Redirecting cybersecurity efforts to an external provider not only provides IT departments with flexibility, but also reduces costs compared to handling cybersecurity in house. Managing cybersecurity independently creates costs such as staffing, software licensing, hardware, implementation costs, and management costs. All the costs and management required for effective security can be overwhelming and managed security services takes the weight of maintaining the security of your data off your shoulders.

What are the benefits of using cloud security services?

Implementing strong cloud security may seem like an obvious choice for a business to make, but many businesses may not want to devote the time, resources, or money to building and maintaining a strong cybersecurity system. Investing your resources into cloud security is imperative for your business and pays off in the long run.

Five different benefits resulting from a strong cloud security system include:

  • Automation: Once your configurations have been set up, there is reduced reliance on human intervention. This minimizes time spent managing security while also reducing the risk for error.
  • Efficiency: Cloud services improve the security of your data and maintain regulatory compliance through timely patching and automated updates with less downtime.
  • Safety: Data is well-protected with cloud security due to 24/7 monitoring and real-time threat detection.
  • Proactive Defense: Threats are identified quickly and treated proactively in the cloud should an incident occur.
  • Cost-effective: The cloud requires a unique approach to security. While managed cloud security services can seem costly upfront, they prove to be worthwhile in the long run by utilizing expertise that may not be available in-house. Additionally, cloud security services will ensure the safety of your workloads and data, and prevent the costs associated with a data breach.

2nd Watch Managed Cloud Security

At 2nd Watch, we understand cloud security is important at every step of your cloud journey. 2nd Watch has a dedicated Managed Security Team that monitors your cloud environments 24/7/365, remediating vulnerabilities quickly. Rather than putting security on the backburner, we believe security is a pillar of business, and building it into the foundation of a company is important to meet evolving compliance needs in a cost-effective manner.

Companies just getting started in the cloud can rely on 2nd Watch to get security right for them the first time. Even for companies already established in the cloud, we can take an in-depth look at security and compliance maturity, existing capabilities, and growth trajectory to provide a prescriptive security roadmap. No matter where you are in your cloud journey, we ensure your security is well-integrated into your cloud environments.

At 2nd Watch we are with you from beginning to end, monitoring your security even after implementation. At a glance, our end-to-end services include:

  • Security Review: Ensures the proper safeguards are utilized for your multi-cloud environments with a single point of contact for your security needs. Our security assessment and remediation offering can reveal how your cloud security posture stacks up to industry standards such as CIS, GDPR, CCPA, HIPAA, NIST, PCI DSS, and SOC 2.
  • Environment Monitoring: 24/7/365 multi-cloud monitoring protects against the most recent vulnerabilities.
  • Threat Analysis: Managed Reliability Operations Center (ROC) proactively analyzes and remediates potential threats.
  • Issue Resolution: Identified issues are quickly resolved providing enterprise class and proactive defense.

Other solutions we provide include:

Security should be integrated into every layer of your public cloud infrastructure. We can help you achieve that through our comprehensive suite of security services and a team of experts that cares about your success in the cloud. To learn more about our managed cloud security services, visit our Cloud, Compliance, Security, & Business Continuity page or talk to someone directly through our Contact Us page.

-Tessa Foley, Marketing

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Why Media Companies Should Adopt the Cloud

The Advantages of Cloud Computing for Media & Entertainment

We are living in a revolutionary era of digital content and media consumption. As such, media companies are reckoning with the new challenges that come with new times. One of the biggest changes in the industry is consumer demand and behavior. To adapt, M&E brands need to digitally transform their production, distribution, and monetization processes. Cloud solutions are a crucial tool for this evolution, and M&E organizations should prioritize cloud strategy as a core pillar of their business models to address industry-wide shifts and stay relevant in today’s ultra-competitive landscape.

The Challenge: Addressing Greater Audience Expectations and Volatility

Viewing behavior and media distribution has greatly impacted the M&E industry. Entertainment content consumption is at an all-time high, and audiences are finding new and more ways to watch media. Today, linear television is considered old-school, and consumers are favoring platforms that give them the power of choice and freedom. Why would you tune in to your cable television at a specific time to watch your favorite show when you can watch that same show anytime, anywhere, on any device or platform?

With new non-linear television services, media companies have less control over their audiences’ viewing experience. Before, viewers were constrained by broadcasting schedules and immobile, unconnected TVs. Now, audiences have taken viewership into their own hands, and M&E brands must discover ways to retain their viewers’ attention and loyalty in the era of endless options of content creators and streaming platforms.

Cloud Computing for Media & Entertainment

The Cloud Has the Flexibility and Scalability to Handle Complex Workflows

OTT streaming services are the most popular alternative to linear television broadcasting. It is a solution that meets the audience’s expectation of access to content of their choosing whenever and wherever they want. However, OTT platforms require formatting multiple video files to be delivered to any device with varying connection speeds. As such, OTT streaming services need advanced video streaming workflows that encode and transcode, protect content, and possess storage capacities that continuously grow.

Because OTT broadcasting has complicated workflows and intense infrastructure needs, M&E companies need to consider scalability. OTT streaming that utilizes on-premises data centers will stymie growth for media organizations because legacy applications and software are resource and labor intensive. When OTT services are set up with on-premises streaming, it requires a group of configured live encoding and streaming services to deliver content to audiences.

The in-house services then need to have the computing capacity and capabilities in order to deliver content without interruptions. On top of that, technical staff are necessary to maintain the proprietary hardware, ensure its security, and continuously upgrade it as audiences grow. If companies opt for on-premises OTT streaming, they will not be able to achieve the scalability and quality of experience that they need to keep up with audience expectations.

A cloud-based infrastructure solves all of these issues. To reiterate, on-premises OTT platforms are very resource-intensive with complex ongoing maintenance and high upfront costs. Using cloud services for OTT streaming addresses the downfalls of on-premises streaming by leveraging a network for services dedicated to delivering video files. The benefits of cloud computing for OTT workflows immensely impact streaming latency and distribution, leading to a better end user experience. Cloud infrastructures have the following advantages to on-premises infrastructure:

  • Geography: Unlike in-house data centers, cloud servers can be located around the world, and content can be delivered to audiences via the closest data center, thereby reducing streaming latency.
  • Encoding and transcoding: Cloud services have the ability and capacity to host rendered files and ensure they are ready for quick delivery.
  • Flexible scalability: Providers can easily scale services up or down based on audience demands by simply adding more cloud resources, rather than having to purchase more infrastructure.
  • Cost optimization: Cloud cost is based on only the resources a business uses with none of the maintenance and upkeep costs, and the price adjusts up or down depending on how much is consumed. on-premises costs include server hardware, power consumption, and space. Furthermore, on-premises is inflexible based on actual consumption.

The Cloud Can Help You Better Understand Your Audiences to Increase Revenue

Another buzzword we hear often these days is “big data.” As audiences grow and demonstrate complex behaviors, it’s important to capture those insights to better understand what will increase engagement and loyalty. Cloud computing is able to ingest and manage big data in a way that is actionable: it is one thing to collect data, but it is another thing to process and do something with it. For M&E organizations, utilizing this data helps improve user experiences, optimize supply chains, and monetize content better.

Big data involves manipulating petabytes of data, and the scalable nature of a cloud environment makes it possible to deploy data-intensive applications that power business analytics. The cloud also simplifies connectivity and collaboration within an organization, which gives teams access to relevant and real time analytics and streamlines data sharing. Furthermore, most public cloud providers offer machine learning tools, which makes processing big data even more efficient.

From a data standpoint, a cloud platform is an advantageous option for those who are handling big data and want to make data-driven decisions. The compelling benefits of cloud computing for data are as follows:

  • Faster scalability: Large volumes of both structured and unstructured data requires increased processing power, storage, and more. The cloud provides not only readily-available infrastructure, but also the ability to scale this infrastructure very rapidly to manage large spikes in traffic or usage.
  • Better analytic tools: The cloud offers a number of instant, on demand analytic tools that enable extract, transform, and loading (ETL) of massive datasets to provide meaningful insights quickly.
  • Lowers cost of analytics: Mining big data in the cloud has made the analytics process less costly. In addition to the reduction of on-premises infrastructure, companies are reducing costs related to system maintenance and upgrades, energy consumption, facility management, and more when switching to a cloud infrastructure. Moreover, the cloud’s pay-as-you-go model is more cost-efficient, with little waste of resources.
  • Better resiliency: In cases of cyber-attacks, power outages or equipment failure, traditional data recovery strategies are slow, complex, and risky. The task of replicating a data center (with duplicate storage, servers, networking equipment, and other infrastructure) in preparation for a disaster is tedious, difficult, and expensive. On top of that, legacy systems often take very long to back up and restore, and this is especially true in the era of big data and large digital content libraries, when data stores are so immense and expansive. Having the data stored in cloud infrastructure will allow your organization to recover from disasters faster, thus ensuring continued access to information and vital big data insights.

The Cloud is Secure

There is a misconception that the public cloud is less secure than traditional data centers. Of course, these are valid concerns: media companies must protect sensitive data, such as customers’ personally identifiable information. As a result, security and compliance is crucial for an M&E business’s migration to the cloud.

We have read about cloud security breaches in news headlines. In most cases, these articles fail to accurately point out where the problem occurred. Usually, these breaches occur not due to the security of the cloud itself, but due to the policies and technologies for security and control of the technology. In nearly all cases, it is the user, not the cloud provider, who fails to manage the controls used to protect an organization’s data. The question for M&E business should not be “Is the cloud secure?” but rather “Am I using the cloud securely?”

Whether M&E organizations use a public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, they can be confident in the security of their data and content. Here is how the cloud is as secure, if not more secure, than in-house data centers:

  • Cloud architecture is homogenous: In building their data centers, cloud providers used the same blueprint and built-in security capabilities throughout their fabrics. The net effect is a reduced attack footprint and fewer holes to exploit since the application of security is ubiquitous.
  • Public cloud providers invest heavily in security measures: The protection of both the infrastructure and the cloud services is priority one and receives commensurate investment. Public cloud providers collectively invest billions in security research, innovation, and protection.
  • Patching and security management is consistent: Enterprises experience security breaches most often because of errors in configuration and unpatched vulnerabilities. Public cloud providers are responsible for the security of the cloud, which includes patching of infrastructure and managed services.

-Anthony Torabi, Strategic Account Executive, Media & Entertainment

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Back to the Basics: The 3 Cloud Computing Service Delivery Models

In recent years, the adoption of cloud computing services has increased tremendously, especially given the onset of the pandemic. According to a report from the International Data Corporation (IDC), the public cloud services market grew 24.1% year over year in 2020. This increase in popularity is credited to the benefits provided by cloud including flexibility, on-demand capacity planning, cost reductions, and ability for users to access shared resources from anywhere.

No matter where you are in your cloud journey, understanding foundational concepts like the different types of cloud service models is important to your success in the cloud. These cloud computing service models provide different levels of control, flexibility, and management capabilities. With a greater understanding of the models, their benefits, and the different ways to deploy these infrastructures, you can determine the method that matches your business needs best.

What are the 3 Cloud Computing Service Delivery Models?

Different cloud computing service delivery models help meet different needs, and determining which model is best for you is an important first step when you transition to the cloud. The three major models are IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

IaaS is one of the most flexible cloud computing models. The infrastructure and its features are presented in a completely remote environment, allowing clients direct access to servers, networking, storage, and availability zones. Additionally, IaaS environments have automated deployments, significantly speeding up your operations in comparison to manual deployments. Some examples of IaaS vendors include Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. In these types of environments, the vendor is responsible for the infrastructure, but the users still have complete control over the Identity Access Management, data, applications, runtime, middleware, operating system, and virtual network.

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

Another cloud computing service delivery model is Platform as a Service (PaaS). PaaS is a subset of IaaS, except customers are only responsible for Identity Access Management, data, and applications and it removes the need for organizations to manage the underlying infrastructure. Rather than having the responsibility over hardware and operating systems as with IaaS, PaaS helps you focus on the deployment and management of your applications. There is less need for resource procurement, capacity planning, software maintenance, and patching. Some examples of PaaS include Windows Azure, Google AppEngine and AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

Software as a Service (SaaS)

Perhaps the most well-known of all three models is SaaS, where the deployment is redistributed to third party services. The customer’s only responsibilities are Identity Access Management, data, and the task of managing software. SaaS offers the entire package offered between IaaS and PaaS, as infrastructure, middleware, and applications deployed over the web can be seamlessly accessed from any place at any time, no matter the platform. Vendors of SaaS include CRM services like Salesforce and productivity software services like Google Apps. One major benefit of SaaS is that it reduces the costs of software ownership and eliminates the need for IT staff to manage the software so your company can focus on what it does best.  Another benefit of SaaS that its relevance to businesses today, as SaaS is considered the best option for remote collaboration. With SaaS, your applications can be accessed from any geographical location and your company is not responsible for managing the hardware.

Cloud Computing Service Delivery Models

Choosing the Cloud Computing Model that is Right for You

 Each cloud computing service model has different benefits to consider when determining the model that will work best for your business needs, projects, and goals.

While IaaS gives you complete control over your infrastructure, some businesses may decide they do not need to fully manage their applications and infrastructure on their own. IaaS is considered a good fit for SMEs and startups who do not have the resources or time to buy and build the infra for their own network. Additionally, larger companies may prefer to have complete control and scalability over their infrastructure, so they too may opt for IaaS for a pay-as-you go, remote option with powerful tools. One downside to IaaS is that it is more costly in comparison to PaaS and SaaS cloud computing models, yet it does minimize costs in the sense it eliminates the need to deploy on-premises hardware.

IaaS Benefits

  • Reduced vendor lock-in
  • Platform virtualizations
  • On-demand scaling
  • GUI and API-based access
  • Increased security
  • Multi-tenant architecture

IaaS Disadvantages

  • Potential for vendor outages
  • The cost of training how to manage new infrastructure

PaaS is a good choice if you are looking to decrease your application’s time-to-market, because of its remote flexibility and accessibility. Thus, if your project involves multiple developers and vendors, each have quick accessibility to computing and networking resources through a PaaS. PaaS might also be used by a team of developers to test software and applications.

PaaS Benefits

  • Rapid product development through simplified process
  • Custom solutions
  • Highly scalable
  • Eliminates need to manage basic infrastructure
  • Future-proof
  • Multi-tenant architecture

PaaS Disadvantages

  • Security issues
  • Increased dependency on vendor for speed and support

SaaS is a feasible option for smaller companies that need to launch their ecommerce quickly or for short term projects that require quick, easy, and affordable collaboration from either a web or mobile standpoint. Any company that requires frequent collaboration such as transferring content and scheduling meetings will find SaaS convenient and accessible.

SaaS Benefits

  • On-demand service
  • Automated provisioning/management of your cloud infrastructure
  • Subscription-based billing
  • Allows for full remote collaboration
  • Reduced software costs
  • Pay-as-you-go

SaaS Disadvantages

  • Less control
  • Limited solutions

The 3 Cloud Computing Deployment Models

Another foundational concept of cloud are the deployment models. A deployment model is where your infrastructure resides and also determines who has control over its management. Like the cloud computing service delivery models, it is also important to choose the deployment model that will best meet the needs of your business.

There are three types of cloud computing deployment models:

Public Cloud

A cloud deployment means your applications are fully run in the cloud and accessible by the public. Often, organizations will choose a public cloud deployment for scalability reasons or when security is not a main concern. For example, when testing an application. Businesses may choose to create or migrate applications to the cloud to take advantage of its benefits, such as its easy set-up and low costs. Additionally, a public cloud deployment allows for a cloud service provider to manage your cloud infrastructure for you.

On-Premises/Private

 An on-premises cloud deployment, or private cloud deployment, is for companies who need to protect and secure their data and are willing to pay more to do so. Since its on-premises, the data and infrastructure are accessed and managed by your own IT team. Due to in-house maintenance and fixed scalability, this deployment model is the costliest.

Hybrid

 A hybrid cloud deployment connects cloud-based resources and existing non-cloud resources that do not exist in the cloud. The most common way to do this is between a public cloud and on-premises infrastructure. Through a hybrid cloud integration, you can segment data according to the needs of your business. For example, putting your highly sensitive data on-premises while putting less-sensitive data on the public cloud for accessibility and cost-effectiveness. This allows you to enjoy the benefits of the cloud while maintaining a secure environment for your data.

Next Steps

Determining the cloud computing service delivery model and deployment model best for your organization are both critical steps to the success of your company’s cloud computing journey. Get it right the first time by consulting with 2nd Watch. With a decade of experience as a managed service provider, we provide cloud services for your public cloud workloads. As an AWS Consulting Partner, Gold Microsoft Partner, and Google Cloud Partner, our team has the knowledge and expertise to efficiently guide you through your cloud journey. Contact us to learn more or talk to one of our experts.

-Tessa Foley, Marketing

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An Introduction to AWS Proton

As a business scales, so does its software and infrastructure. As desired outcomes adapt and become more complex that can quickly cause a lot of overhead and difficulty for platform teams to manage over time and these challenges often limit the benefits of embracing containers and serverless. Shared services offer many advantages in these scenarios by providing a consistent developer experience while also increasing productivity and effectivity of governance and cost management.

Introduced in December 2020 Amazon Web Services announced the general availability of Proton: an application targeted at providing tooling to manage complex environments while bridging infrastructure and deployment for developers. In this blog we will take a closer look into the benefits of the AWS Proton service offering.

What is AWS Proton?

AWS Proton is a fully managed delivery service, targeted at container and serverless workloads, that provides engineering teams the tooling to automate provisioning and deploy applications while enabling them to provide observability and enforce compliance and best practices. With AWS Proton, development teams utilize resources for infrastructure and to deploy their code. This in turn increases developer productivity by allowing them to focus on their code, software delivery, reduce management overhead, and increase release frequency. Teams can use AWS Proton through the AWS Console and the AWS CLI, allowing for teams to get started quickly and automate complicated operations over time.

How does it work?

The AWS Proton framework allows administrators to define versioned templates which standardize infrastructure, enforce guard rails, leverage Infrastructure as Code with CloudFormation, and provide CI/CD with Code Pipeline and Code Build to automate provisioning and deployments. Once service templates are defined, developers can choose a template and use it to deploy their software. As new code is released, the CI/CD pipelines automatically deploys the changes. Additionally, as new template versions are defined, AWS Proton provides a “one-click” interface which allows administrators to roll out infrastructure updates across all the outdated template versions.

When is AWS Proton right for you?

AWS Proton is built for teams looking to centrally manage their cloud resources. The service interface is built for teams to provision deploy and monitor applications. AWS Proton is worth considering if you are using cloud native services like Serverless applications or if you utilize containers in AWS. The benefits continually grow when working with a service-oriented architecture, microservices, or distributed software as it eases release management, reduces lead time, and creates an environment for teams to operate within a set of rules with little to no additional overhead. AWS Proton is also a good option if you are looking to introduce Infrastructure as Code or CI/CD pipelines to new or even existing software as AWS Proton supports linking existing resources.

Getting Started is easy!

Platform Administrators

Since AWS Proton itself is free and you only pay for the underlying resources, you are only a few steps away from giving it a try! First a member of the platform infrastructure team creates an environment template. An environment defines infrastructure that is foundational to your applications and services including compute networking (VPCs), Code Pipelines, Security, and Monitoring. Environments are defined via CloudFormation templates and use Jinja for parameters rather than the conventional parameters section in standard CloudFormation templates. You can find template parameter examples in the AWS documentation. You can create, view, update, and manage your environment templates and their versions in the AWS Console.

Introduction to AWS Proton Service | 2nd Watch

Once an environment template is created the platform administrator would create a service template which defines all resources that are logically relative to a service. For example, if we had a container which performs some ETL this could contain an ECR Repository, ECS Cluster, ECS Service Definition, ECS Task Definition, IAM roles, and the ETL source and target storage.

In another example, we could have an asynchronous lambda which performs some background tasks and its corresponding execution role. You could also consider using schema files for parameter validation! Like environment templates, you can create, view, update, and manage your service templates and their versions in the AWS Console.

Once the templates have been created the platform administrator can publish the templates and provision the environment. Since services also include CI/CD pipelines platform administrators should also configure repository connections by creating the GitHub app connector. This is done in the AWS Developer Tools service or a link can be found on the AWS Proton page in the Console.

Once authorized, the GitHub app is automatically created and integrated with AWS and CI/CD pipelines will automatically detect available connections during service configuration.

 

At this time platform administrators should see a stack which contains the environment’s resources. They can validate each resource, interconnectivity, security, audits, and operational excellence.

Developers

At this point developers can choose which version they will use to deploy their service. Available services can be found in the AWS Console and developers can review the template and requirements before deployment. Once they have selected the target template they choose the repository that contains their service code, the GitHub app connection created by the platform administrator, and any parameters required by the service and CodePipeline.

After some time, developers should be able to see their application stack in CloudFormation, their application’s CodePipeline resources, and the resources for their application accordingly!

In Closing

AWS Proton is a new and exciting service available for those looking to adopt Infrastructure as Code, enable CI/CD pipelines for their products, and enforce compliance, consistent standards, and best practices across their software and infrastructure. Here we explored a simple use case, but real world scenarios likely require a more thorough examination and implementation.

AWS Proton may require a transition for teams that already utilize IaC, CI/CD, or that have created processes to centrally manage their platform infrastructure. 2nd Watch has over 10 years’ experience in helping companies move to the cloud and implement shared services platforms to simplify modern cloud operations. Start a conversation with a solution expert from 2nd Watch today and together we will assess and create a plan built for your goals and targets!

-Isaiah Grant, Cloud Consultant

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Why Cloud Services are Here to Stay for Media & Entertainment

During the COVID-19 pandemic, media and entertainment (M&E) organizations accelerated their need to undertake a digital transformation. As we approach a post-pandemic world, M&E companies are realizing that their digital transformation is no longer just a short-term solution, but rather, it is a long-term necessity to survive the increasingly competitive and saturated landscape of content distribution and consumption. Cloud service providers play a crucial role to M&E brands as they continue their digital evolution. Throughout the pandemic, cloud solutions allowed M&E companies to adapt efficiently and effectively. Beyond the landscape of COVID-19, a cloud-based framework will continue to facilitate agility and scalability in the M&E business model.  

Cloud Services for Media and Entertainment (M&E) | 2nd Watch

How COVID-19 Impacted the Media and Entertainment Industry

When COVID-19 created an unprecedented environment and altered our daily operations, people and businesses had to rapidly adjust to the new circumstances. In particular, the M&E industry faced a reckoning that was imminent before the pandemic and became more acute during the pandemic.

For M&E businesses, COVID-19 forced upon them an important pivotal point in their digital strategy. The pandemic didn’t present vastly new challenges for M&E organizations, it simply accelerated and highlighted the problems they had already begun experiencing in the last five or so years. Viewer behavior is one of the biggest shake-ups in the M&E industry. Prior to 2020, audiences were already hunting for new ways to consume content. Traditional linear broadcast was waning and modern digital streaming services were booming. Media content consumption was drastically changing, as audiences streamed content on different devices, such as their smartphones, tablets, connected TVs, PCs, and gaming consoles. Now, legacy M&E brands are no longer competing just against nimble new players in the streaming space, but they are also competing against music, gaming, and esport platforms. All of these trends that were in motion pre-pandemic became more apparent after society began sheltering-in-place.

With most of the United States going remote, industry giants, like Warner Brothers and Disney, pivoted their focus to streaming content to adjust to shelter-in-place orders. In an unprecedented move, Warner Brothers began releasing new movies in theaters and via streaming platforms simultaneously. Disney’s emphasis on its streaming service, Disney Plus, paid off:  it exploded during quarantine and quickly accumulated 100 million subscribers. Additionally, Disney also followed a similar cinema distribution model to Warner Brothers by releasing new hits via streaming rather than just in theaters. 

The need for digital innovation was crucial for the M&E industry to adapt to the new circumstances created by the pandemic, and this need will continue long into the post-COVID world. M&E organizations faced a catalyst in their structural transformation, and the digitization of content workflows and distribution became absolutely imperative as employees went remote and content consumption hit an all-time high. Moreover, certain market trends were felt more acutely during the pandemic and represented a paradigmatic shift for the M&E industry. These trends include the rise of direct-to-consumer, content wars via mergers and acquisitions, and wavering audience loyalty. Change is ever-present, and the consequences of not adapting to the modern world became obvious and unavoidable in the face of the pandemic. Ultimately, M&E incumbents who are slow to modernize their technology, production, and monetization strategies will be left behind by more agile competitors

How M&E Companies Can Use the Cloud to Innovate

As we return “back to normal,” we’ll see how the pandemic affected our societal structures temporarily and permanently. The M&E industry was particularly changed in an irrevocable manner: a new age of media has been fully realized, and M&E businesses will have to rethink their business models as a result. How the pandemic will continue to evolve from here is still unknown, but it is clear that media organizations will have to continue to innovate in order to keep up with the changes in working patterns and audience behavior.

To adapt to the accelerated changes driven by COVID-19, the modern media supply chain will require agility, flexibility, and scalability. Cloud solutions (such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, and Google Cloud Platform) are the key enabler for M&E companies as they look to innovate. According to a Gartner report on digital transformation in media and entertainment, 80% of broadcasters and content creators migrated all or part of their operations to public cloud platforms as an urgent response to effects of quarantine in 2020. By switching to cloud-based infrastructures, M&E companies were able to collaborate and create remotely, better understand real-time audience behavior, and maintain a secure environment while supporting media production, storage, processing, and distribution requirements.

There is no one-size-fits-all cloud strategy, as it is dependent on the business. Some companies opt for a single cloud provider, while others choose a multi cloud strategy. A hybrid cloud solution is also an option, which utilizes data centers in conjunction with cloud service providers. Regardless of a company’s cloud strategy, the benefits of migrating to the cloud remain the same. Below we’ll dive into a couple of the pros of utilizing the cloud for morderning workflows, supply chains, and data analyses. 

Unifying Workflows

With a cloud platform, teams can now collaborate remotely and globally, which ultimately leads to greater productivity and efficiency in content creation. When it comes to media production, whether it is live or pre-filmed, massive teams of professionals are needed to make the vision come alive (editors, visual effects artists, production professionals, etc.) COVID-19 demonstrated that teams using cloud service providers could still work collaboratively and effectively in a remote environment. In fact, businesses realized that requiring teams to come on-site for content production can be more time consuming and costly than working remotely. Virtual post-production is a great example of how the cloud is more economical from a financial and time sense. Using a modern cloud infrastructure, M&E brands can create virtual workstations, which replaces physical workstations at the user’s desk. Unlike traditional workstations, virtual workstations do not have a capital expense. Virtual workstations are extremely customizable in terms of size and power to the exact specifications needed for a given task. Furthermore, the billing is flexible and you only pay for what resources you use. Lastly, with physical workstations, there are many “hidden costs.” Think about the electricity and staffing fees that businesses must pay in order to keep a workstation running. When you switch to a virtual workstation for post-production work, all of the aforementioned costs are managed by a cloud service provider.

Streamlining the Media Supply Chain

As media and entertainment shifts to direct-to-consumer, content management has become absolutely crucial in the media supply chain. Content libraries are only growing bigger and there is an influx of newly-produced assets as team workflows work more efficiently. Even so, most media companies store their library assets on-premise and within tape-based LTO cartridges. By doing so, these assets are neither indexable, searchable, or readily accessible. This slows down editing, versioning, compliance checking, and repackaging, all of which hurts an organization’s ability for rapid content monetization. By implementing a cloud-based infrastructure, M&E companies can utilize tools like machine learning capabilities to manage, activate, and monetize their assets throughout the content supply chain.

Capturing Real-time Data

Archaic and lagged metrics, such as overnight ratings and box office returns, will struggle today to produce actionable insights. Digital transformation for M&E organizations will require a technology and cultural transformation towards a data-driven mindset. To make data-driven decisions, you need to have the tools to collect, process, and analyze the data. Cloud platforms can help process big data by employing machine learning capabilities to deeply understand audiences, which can translate into monetization opportunities further down the funnel. By harnessing the cloud to redefine data strategy, businesses can make confident decisions using real-time data and use actionable insights to deliver real transformation. 

Conclusion 

Before the pandemic, 2020 was shaping up to be a pivotal year for the M&E industry as audience behavior was changing and new competitors were cropping up; however, the effects of the COVID-19 expedited these trends and forced organizations to transform immediately. In this new age of media, M&E companies must reckon with these unique and long-lasting challenges and seek to change their business models, cultures and technologies to keep up with the changing landscape. 

-Anthony Torabi, Media & Entertainment Strategic Account Executive

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Simple & Secure Data Lakes with AWS Lake Formation

Data is the lifeblood of business. To help companies visualize their data, guide business decisions, and enhance their business operations requires employing machine learning services. But where to begin. Today, tremendous amounts of data are created by companies worldwide, often in disparate systems.

Secure Data Lakes with AWS Lake Formation

These large amounts of data, while helpful, don’t necessarily need to be processed immediately, yet need to be consolidated into a single source of truth to enable business value. Companies are faced with the issue of finding the best way to securely store their raw data for later use. One popular type of data store is referred to as a “data lake, and is very different from the traditional data warehouse.

Use Case: Data Lakes and McDonald’s

McDonald’s brings in about 1.5 million customers each day, creating 20-30 new data points with each of their transactions. The restaurant’s data comes from multiple data sources including a variety of data vendors, mobile apps, loyalty programs, CRM systems, etc. With all this data to use from various sources, the company wanted to build a complete perspective of a CLV and other useful analytics. To meet their needs for data collection and analytics, McDonald’s France partnered with 2nd Watch. The data lake allowed McDonald’s to ingest data into one source, reducing the effort required to manage and analyze their large amounts of data.

Due to their transition from a data warehouse to a data lake, McDonald’s France has greater visibility into the speed of service, customer lifetime value, and conversion rates. With an enhanced view of their data, the company can make better business decisions to improve their customers’ experience. So, what exactly is a data lake, how does it differ from a data warehouse, and how do they store data for companies like McDonald’s France?

What is a Data Lake?

A data lake is a centralized storage repository that holds a vast amount of raw data in its native format until it is needed for use. A data lake can include any combination of:

  • Structured data: highly organized data from relational databases
  • Semi-structured data: data with some organizational properties, such as HTML
  • Unstructured data: data without a predefined data model, such as email

Data Lakes are often mistaken for Data Warehouses, but the two data stores cannot be used interchangeably. Data Warehouses, the more traditional data store, process and store your data for analytical purposes. Filtering data through data warehouses occurs automatically, and the data can arrive from multiple locations. Data lakes, on the other hand, store and centralize data that comes in without processing it. Thus, there is no need to identify a specific purpose for the data as with a data warehouse environment. Your data, whether in its original form or curated form, can be stored in a data lake. Companies often choose a data lake for their flexibility in supporting any type of data, their scalability, analytics, machine learning capabilities, and low costs.

While Data Warehouses are appealing for their element of automatically curated data and fast results, data lakes can lead to several areas of improvement for your data and business including:

  • Improved customer interactions
  • Improved R&D innovation choices
  • Increase operational efficiencies

Essentially, a piece of information stored in a data lake will seem like a small drop in a big lake. Due to the lack of organization and security that tends to occur when storing large quantities of data in data lakes, this storing method has received some criticism. Additionally, setting up a data lake can be time and labor intensive, often taking months to complete. This is because, when built the traditional way, there are a series of steps that need to be completed and then repeated for different data sets.

Even once fully architected, there can be errors in the setup due to your data lakes being manually configured over an extended period. An important piece to your data lake is a data catalog, which uses machine learning capabilities to recognize data and create a universal schema when new datasets come into your data lake. Without defined mechanisms and proper governance, your data lake can quickly become a “data swamp”, where your data becomes hard to manage, analyze, and ultimately becomes unusable. Fortunately, there is a solution to all these problems. You can build a well-architected data lake in a short amount of time with AWS Lake Formation.

AWS Lake Formation & its Benefits

Traditionally, data lakes were set up as on-premises deployments before people realized the value and security provided by the cloud. These on-premises environments required continual adjustments for things like optimization and capacity planning—which is now easier due to cloud services like AWS Lake Formation. Deploying data lakes in the cloud provides scalability, availability, security, and faster time to build and deploy your data lake.

AWS Lake Formation is a service that makes it easy to set up a secure data lake in days, saving your business a lot of time and effort to focus on other aspects of your business. While AWS Lake Formation significantly cuts down the time it takes to setup your data lake, it is built and deployed securely. Additionally, AWS Lake Formation enables you to break down data silos and combine a variety of analytics to gain data insights and ultimately guide better business decisions. The benefits delivered by this AWS service are:

  • Build data lakes quickly: To build a data lake in Lake Formation, you simply need to import data from databases already in AWS, other AWS sources, or from other external sources. Data stored in Amazon S3, for example, can be moved into your data lake, where your crawl, catalog, and prepare your data for analytics. Lake Formation also helps transform data with AWS Glue to prepare for it for quality analytics. Additionally, with AWS’s FindMatches, data can be cleaned and deduplicated to simplify your data.
  • Simplify security management: Security management is simpler with Lake Formation because it provides automatic server-side encryption, providing a secure foundation for your data. Security settings and access controls can also be configured to ensure high-level security. Ones configured with rules, Lake formation enforces your access controls. With Lake Formation, your security and governance standards will be met.
  • Provide self-service access to data: With large amounts of data in your data lake, finding the data you need for a specific purpose can be difficult. Through Lake Formation, your users can search for relevant data using custom fields such as name, contents, and sensitivity to make discovering data easier. Lake Formation can also be paired with AWS analytics services, such as Amazon Athena, Amazon Redshift, and Amazon EMR. For example, queries can be run through Amazon Athena using data that is registered with Lake Formation.

Building a data lake is one hurdle but building a well-architected and secure data lake is another. With Lake Formation, building and managing data lakes is much easier. On a secure cloud environment, your data will be safe and easy to access.

2nd Watch has been recognized as a Premier Consulting Partner by AWS for nearly a decade and our engineers are 100% certified on AWS. Contact us to learn more about AWS Lake Formation or to get assistance building your data lake.

-Tessa Foley, Marketing

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Riding the Digital Transformation: Why Enterprises Are Reengineering Their Cloud Infrastructure

Post 2020, how are you approaching the cloud? The rapid and unexpected digital transformation of 2020 forced enterprises worldwide to quickly mobilize workers using cloud resources. Now, as the world returns to an altered normal, it’s time for organizations to revisit their cloud infrastructure components with a fresh perspective. Hybrid work environments, industry transformations, changing consumer behavior, and growing cyber threats have all effected the way we do business. Now it might be time to change your cloud.

Cloud Infrastructure and digital transformatio

Risk mitigation at scale

Avoiding potential missteps in your strategy requires both wide and narrow insights. With the right cloud computing infrastructure, network equipment, and operating systems, organizations can achieve better risk mitigation and management with cloud scalability. As you continue to pursue business outcomes, you have to solve existing problems, as well as plan for the future. Some of these problems include:

  • Scaling your cloud platform and infrastructure services quickly to keep up with increasing and/or unexpected demand.
  • Maximizing cloud computing services and computing power to accommodate storage, speed, and resource demands.
  • Prioritizing new and necessary investments and delivery models within a fixed budget.
  • Innovating faster to remain, or gain, competitive advantage.

Overall, to avoid risk, you need to gain efficiency, and that’s what the cloud can do. Cloud infrastructure, applications, and Software as a Service (SaaS) solutions are designed to decrease input, and increase output and effectiveness. The scalability of cloud services allows enterprises to continue growing and innovating, without requiring heavy investments. With continuous cloud optimization, you’re positioned to adapt, innovate, and succeed regardless of the unknown future.

Application modernization for data leverage

Much of the digital transformation started with infrastructure modernization and the development of IaaS as a base line. Now, application modernization is accelerating alongside a changing migration pattern. What used to be simply ‘lift and shift’ is now ‘lift and evolve.’ Enterprises want to collaborate with cloud experts to gain a deeper understanding of applications as they become more cloud native. With a constant pipeline of new applications and services, organizations need guidance to avoid cloud cost sprawl and streamline environment integration.

As application modernization continues, organizations are gaining access to massive amounts of data that are enabling brand new opportunities. This requires a new look at database architectures to make sure you’re unlocking value internally and potentially, externally. While application modernization and database architecture are interconnected, they can also transform separately. We’re starting to see people recognize the importance of strategic cloud transformations that include the entire data footprint – whether it’s the underlying architecture, or the top level analytics.

Organizations are getting out of long-term licensing agreements, monetizing their data, gaining flexibility, cutting costs, and driving innovation, customer value, and revenue. Data is pulled from, and fed into, a lot of different applications within constantly changing cloud environments, which brings both challenges and opportunities. Enterprises must transform from this to that, but the end goal is constantly changing as well. Therefore continuous motion is necessary within the digital transformation.

Changing core business strategies

One thing is for sure about the digital transformation – it’s not slowing down. Most experts agree that even after pandemic safety precautions are eliminated, the digital transformation will continue to accelerate. After seeing the speed of adoption and opportunities in the cloud, many enterprises are reevaluating the future with new eyes. Budgets for IT are expanding, but so is the IT skills gap and cybersecurity incidents. These transitions present questions in a new light, and enterprises should revisit their answers.

  • Why do you still have your own physical data center?
  • What is the value in outsourcing? And insourcing?
  • How has your risk profile changed?
  • How does data allow you to focus on your core business strategy?

Answering these questions has more enterprises looking to partner with, and learn from, cloud experts – as opposed to just receiving services. Organizations want and need to work alongside cloud partners to close the skills gap within their enterprise, gain skills for internal expansion in the future, and better understand how virtualized resources can improve their business. It’s also a way to invest in your employees to reduce turn-over and encourage long-term loyalty.

Security and compliance

At this point with security, compliance, and ensuring business continuity, enterprises must have solutions in place. There is no other way. Ransomware and phishing attacks have been rising in sophistication and frequency year-over-year, with a noticeable spike since remote work became mainstream. Not only does your internal team need constant training and regular enforcement of governance policies, but there’s a larger emphasis on how your network protections are set up.

Regardless of automation and controls, people will make mistakes and there is an inherent risk in any human activity. In fact, human error is the leading cause of data loss with approximately 88% of all data breaches caused by an employee mistake. Unfortunately, the possibility of a breaches is often made possible because of your internal team. Typically, it’s the manner in which the cloud is configured or architected that creates a loophole for bad actors. It’s not that the public cloud isn’t secure or compliant, it’s that it’s not set up properly. This is where many enterprises are outsourcing data protection to avoid damaging compliance penalties, guarantee uninterrupted business continuity, and maintain the security of sensitive data after malicious or accidental deletion, natural disaster, or in the event that a device is lost, stolen or damaged.

Next steps: Think about day two

Enterprises who think of cloud migration as a one-and-done project – we were there, and now we’re here – aren’t ready to make the move. The cloud is not the answer. The cloud is an enabler to help organizations get the answers necessary to move in the direction they desire. There are risks associated with moving to the cloud – tools can distract from goals, system platforms need support, load balancers have to be implemented, and the cloud has to be leveraged and optimized to be beneficial long-term. Without strategizing past the migration, you won’t get the anticipated results.

It can seem overwhelming to take on the constantly changing cloud (and it certainly can be), but you don’t have to do it alone! Keep up with the pace and innovation of the digital transformation, while focusing on what you do best – growing your enterprise – by letting the experts help. 2nd Watch has a team of trusted cloud advisors to help you navigate cloud complexities for successful and ongoing cloud modernization. As an Amazon Web Services (AWS) Premier Partner, a Microsoft Azure Gold Partner, and a Google Cloud Partner with over 10 years’ experience, 2nd Watch provides ongoing advisory services to some of the largest companies in the world. Contact Us to take the next step in your cloud journey!

-Michael Elliott, Director of Marketing

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Managed Cloud Service: Optimize, Reduce Costs, and Efficiently Achieve your Business Goals

Cloud adoption is becoming more popular across all industries, as it has proven to be reliable, efficient, and more secure as a software service. As cloud adoption increases, companies are faced with the issue of managing these new environments and their operations, ultimately impacting day-to-day business operations. Not only are IT professionals faced with the challenge of juggling their everyday work activities with managing their company’s cloud platforms but must do so in an timely, cost-efficient manner. Often, this requires hiring and training additional IT people—resources that are getting more and more difficult to find.

This is where a managed cloud service provider, like 2nd Watch, comes in.

Managed Cloud Service Provider

What is a Managed Cloud Service Provider?

Managing your cloud operations on your own can seem like a daunting, tedious task that distracts from strategic business goals. A cloud managed service provider (MSP) monitors and maintains your cloud environments relieving IT from the day-to-day cloud operations, ensuring your business operates efficiently. This is not to say IT professionals are incapable of performing these responsibilities, but rather, outsourcing allows the IT professionals within your company to concentrate on the strategic operations of the business. In other words, you do what you do best, and the service provider takes care of the rest.

The alternative to an MSP is hiring and developing within your company the expertise necessary to keep up with the rapidly evolving cloud environment and cloud native technologies. Doing it yourself factors in a hiring process, training, and payroll costs. While possible, maintaining your cloud environments internally might not be the most feasible option in the long run. Additionally, a private cloud environment can be costly and requires your applications are handled internally. Migrating to the public cloud or adopting hybrid cloud model allows companies flexibility, as they allow a service provider either partial or full control of their network infrastructure.

What are Managed Cloud Services?

Managed cloud services are the IT functions you give your service provider to handle, while still allowing you to handle the functions you want. Some examples of the management that service providers offer include:

  • Managed cloud database: A managed database puts some of your company’s most valuable assets and information into the hands of a complete team of experienced Database Administrators (DBAs). DBAs are available 24/7/365 to perform tasks such as database health monitoring, database user management, capacity planning and management, etc.
  • Managed cloud security services: The public cloud has many benefits, but with it also comes security risks. Security management is another important MSP service to consider for your business. A cloud managed service provider can prevent and detect security threats before they occur, while fully optimizing the benefits provided by a cloud environment.
  • Managed cloud optimization: The cloud can be costly, but only as costly as you allow it to be. An MSP can optimize cloud spend through consulting, implementation, tools, reporting services, and remediation.
  • Managed governance & compliance: Without proper governance, your organization can be exposed to security vulnerabilities. Should a disaster occur within your business, such as a cyberattack on a data center, MSPs offer disaster recovery services to minimize recovery downtime and data loss. A managed governance and compliance service with 2nd Watch helps your Chief Security and Compliance Officers maintain visibility and control over your public cloud environment to help achieve on-going, continuous compliance.

At 2nd Watch, our foundational services include a fully managed cloud environment with 24/7/365 support and industry leading SLAs. Our foundational services address the key needs to better manage spend, utilization, and operations.

What are the Benefits of a Cloud Managed Service Provider?

Using a Cloud Managed Service Provider comes with many benefits if you choose the right one.

Some of these benefits include, but are not limited to: 

  • Cost savings: MSPs have experts that know how to efficiently utilize the cloud, so you get the most out of your resources while reducing cloud computing costs.
  • Increased data security: MSPs ensure proper safeguards are utilized while proactively monitoring and preventing potential threats to your security.
  • Increased employee production: With less time spent managing the cloud, your IT managers can focus on the strategic business operations.
  • 24/7/365 management: Not only do MSPs take care of cloud management for you but do so 100% of the time.
  • Overall business improvement: When your cloud infrastructure is managed by a trusted cloud advisor, they can optimize your environments while simultaneously allowing time for you to focus on core business operations. They can also recommend cloud native solutions to further support the business agility required to compete.

Why Our Cloud Management Platform?

With cloud adoption increasing in popularity, choosing a managed cloud service provider to help with this process can be overwhelming. While there are many options, choosing one you can trust is important to the success of your business. 2nd Watch provides multi-cloud management across AWS, Azure, and GCP, and has a special emphasis of putting our customers before the cloud. Additionally, we use industry standard, cloud native tooling to prevent platform lock in.

The solutions we create at 2nd Watch are tailored to your business needs, creating a large and lasting impact on our clients. For example:

  • On average, 2nd Watch saves customers 41% more than if they managed the cloud themselves (based on customer data)
  • Customers experience increased efficiency in launching applications, adding an average 240 hours of productivity per year for your business
  • On average, we save customers 21% more than our competitors

Next Steps

2nd Watch helps customers at every step in their cloud journey, whether that’s cloud adoption or optimizing your current cloud environment to reduce costs. We can effectively manage your cloud, so you don’t have to. Contact us to get the most out of your cloud environment with a managed cloud service provider you can trust.

-Tessa Foley, Marketing

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6 Reasons the Cloud Might Not be What You Think it Is

A lot of enterprises migrate to the public cloud because they see everyone else doing it. And while you should stay up on the latest and greatest innovations – which often happen in the cloud – you need to be aware of the realities of the cloud and understand different cloud migration strategies. You need to know why you’re moving to the cloud. What’s your goal? And what outcomes are you seeking? Make sure you know what you’re getting your enterprise into before moving forward in your cloud journey.

cloud migration challenges

1. Cloud technology is not a project, it’s a constant

Be aware that while there is a starting point to becoming more cloud native – the migration – there is no stopping point. The migration occurs, but the transformation, development, innovation, and optimization is never over.

There are endless applications and tools to consider, your organization will evolve over time, technology changes regularly, and user preferences change even faster. Fueled by your new operating system, cloud computing puts you into continuous motion. While continuous motion is positive for outcomes, you need to be ready to ride the wave regardless of where it goes. Once you get on, success requires that you stay there.

2. Flex-agility is necessary to survival

Flexibility + agility = flex-agility, and you need it in the cloud. Flex-agility enables enterprises to adapt to the risks and unknowns occurring in the world. The pandemic continues to highlight the need for flex-agility in business. Organizations further along in their cloud journeys were able to quickly establish remote workforces, adjust customer interactions, communicate completely and effectively, and ultimately, continue running. While the pandemic was unprecedented, more commonly, flex-agility is necessary in natural disasters like floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes; after a ransomware or phishing attack; or when an employee’s device is lost, stolen, or destroyed.

3. You still have to move faster than the competition

Gaining or maintaining your competitive edge in the cloud has a lot to do with speed. Whether it’s the dog-eat-dog nature of your industry, macroeconomics, or a political environment, these are the things that speed up innovation. You might not have any control over these things, but they’re shaping the way consumers interact with brands. Again, when you think about how the digital transformation evolved during the pandemic, you saw winning business move the fastest. The cloud is an amazing opportunity to meet all the demands of your environment, but if you’re not looking forward, forecasting trends, and moving faster than the competition, you could fall behind.

4. People are riskier than technology

In many ways, the technology is the easiest part of an enterprise cloud strategy. It’s the people where a lot of risk comes into play. You may have a great strategy with clean processes and tactics, but if the execution is poor, the business can’t succeed. A recent survey revealed that 85% of organizations report deficits in cloud expertise, with the top three areas being cloud platforms, cloud native engineering, and security. While business owners acknowledge the importance of these skills, they’re still struggling to attract the caliber of talent necessary.

In addition to partnering with cloud service experts to ensure a capable team, organizations are also reinventing their technical culture to work more like a startup. This can incentivize the cloud-capable with hybrid work environments, an emphasis on collaboration, use of the agile framework, and fostering innovation.

5. Cost-savings is not the best reason to migrate to the cloud

Buy-in from executives is key for any enterprise transitioning to the cloud. Budget and resources are necessary to continue moving forward, but the business value of a cloud transformation isn’t cost savings. Really, it’s about repurposing dollars to achieve other things. At the end of the day, companies are focused on getting customers, keeping customers, and growing customers, and that’s what the cloud helps to support.

By innovating products and services in a cloud environment, an organization is able to give customers new experiences, sell them new things, and delight them with helpful customer service and a solid user experience. The cloud isn’t a cost center, it’s a business enabler, and that’s what leadership needs to hear.

6. Cloud migration isn’t always the right answer

Many enterprises believe that the process of moving to the cloud will solve all of their problems. Unfortunately, the cloud is just the most popular technology operating system platform today. Sure, it can help you reach your goals with easy-to-use functionality, automated tools, and modern business solutions, but it takes effort to utilize and apply those resources for success.

For most organizations, moving to the cloud is the right answer, but it could be the wrong time. The organization might not know how it wants to utilize cloud functionality. Maybe outcomes haven’t been identified yet, the business strategy doesn’t have buy-in from leadership, or technicians aren’t aware of the potential opportunities. Another issue stalling cloud migration is internal cloud-based expertise. If your technicians aren’t cloud savvy enough to handle all the moving parts, bring on a collaborative cloud advisor to ensure success.

Ready for the next step in your cloud journey?

Cloud Advisory Services at 2nd Watch provide you with the cloud solution experts necessary to reduce complexity and provide impartial guidance throughout migration, implementation, and adoption. Whether you’re just curious about the cloud, or you’re already there, our advanced capabilities support everything from platform selection and cost modeling, to app classification, and migrating workloads from your on-premises data center. Contact us to learn more!

Lisa Culbert, Marketing

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